Section 11 Agreement Caribou

Section 11 Agreement Caribou

“For thousands of years, caribou have given us food, clothing and tools to survive difficult winters. They`re not just animals for us. They are our brothers and sisters, our friends and our ancestors. Caribou have been suffering for decades because their habitat is being gradually destroyed. They need us now, all of us. This partnership agreement gives us hope. This means that help is on its way.¬†– Roland Willson, Chief of the West Moberly First Nations “This agreement with the federal government is consistent with Alberta`s commitment to end decades of uncertainty about karibou recovery and land use,” Nixon said. The conservation agreement allocates $3.255 million in federal funds to support the development and implementation of these supply plans over the next five years. In addition, GNWT has negotiated $1 million in funding to support related engagement and consultation activities to ensure that these plans reflect the values and interests of northern countries. Campbell said the agreement offered valuable protections to the public. “The Alberta government has taken action with Aboriginal peoples, industry stakeholders and many other measures to support caribou recovery, and I believe this agreement will help fulfill its obligations to future generations of Canadians,” said Jonathan Wilkinson, Canada`s Minister of Environment and Climate Change.

The joint agreement announced friday commits to creating self-sufficient herds across the province within a century. Home Newsnous ” AB Government: Sec. 11 Agreement is certainty to industry “Our negotiated section 11 agreement puts Alberta`s needs, instead of having an order to us under the Species at Risk Act. Alberta`s government will continue to work with our many partners to developing common-sense solutions to protect caribou population, maintain jobs and grow local economies,” said Alberta`s Minister of Environment and Parks, Jason Nixon. Carolyn Campbell, a conservation expert at the Alberta Wilderness Nature Association (AWA), said the threat of the agreement being implemented by the federal government was apparently a “powerful motivator” to reach the agreement. “Many years ago, our ancestors received a prophecy from the Creator. The prophecy says that we will find refuge on the mountain of the twin sisters. Our people have always clung to prophecy. We know that is true. It is so appropriate that by protecting the territory of the twin sisters, we can now continue to provide shelter for our vulnerable caribou.¬†– Ken Cameron, Saulteau First Nations Chief The Nature Protection Agreement recognizes and supports our “made in the North” approach to caribou protection and habitat management, and reduces the likelihood that the NWT will be subject to a state protection order. The agreement also provides significant federal funding to support area planning in the NWT over the next five years.

In January 2019, Ecojustice – on behalf of the David Suzuki Foundation, the Alberta Environment Association and Mikisew and Athabasca Chipewyan First Nations – filed a motion in the Federal Court to compel then-Environment Minister Catherine McKenna to place five caribou herds in northeastern Alberta under an emergency protection order. The agreement commits to providing within five years range plans for herds such as Little Smoky, A La Peche, Redrock/Prairie Creek, Narraway, Chinchaga, Cold Lake and a herd on the east side of the Athabasca River. The signing of these two agreements represents historic cooperation between all levels of government, including Aboriginal partners, to implement measures such as habitat protection and restoration, recreation management and maternal instruction. The Federal Species at Risk Act`s Section 11 agreement with the Government of Canada for the conservation and restoration of forest caribou in Alberta provides strong protection against the federal government, which adopts an environmental protection order that would devastate industries in areas close to Caribou habitats and cost Albertan jobs.